"Don't Know Much 'bout History" quiz

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solicitr
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Post by solicitr »

A further historical irony is that one branch of the Puritans -> Congregationalists became the Unitarians- about as perfectly undoctrinaire as a church can be.


On the whole the Southern colonies were relatively easygoing on religious matters, generally following the British government line (which seesawed back and forth), but with a marked lack of vigorous enforcement. The principal form of religious 'discrimination' in colonial Virginia was the fairly assiduous collection of the required licensing fee from Dissenting ministers.

I'm also rather proud of the fact that, while the first synagogue in America was founded in Newport, the next three were in Savannah, Charleston, and Richmond.
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The Watcher
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Post by The Watcher »

solicitr wrote:A further historical irony is that one branch of the Puritans -> Congregationalists became the Unitarians- about as perfectly undoctrinaire as a church can be.


On the whole the Southern colonies were relatively easygoing on religious matters, generally following the British government line (which seesawed back and forth), but with a marked lack of vigorous enforcement. The principal form of religious 'discrimination' in colonial Virginia was the fairly assiduous collection of the required licensing fee from Dissenting ministers.

I'm also rather proud of the fact that, while the first synagogue in America was founded in Newport, the next three were in Savannah, Charleston, and Richmond.
I know I am even further derailing this thread, but, yes, I did know about the segue from Puritanism into Unitarianism. Further, I have a genealogical link which might show that a previously Jewish branch of my maternal grandmothers' family might have immigrated here and then adopted Unitarianism as their faith because, given Iowa at the time, synagogues were going to be few and far between. I highly suspect that this one branch of the family was Jewish, given the surname at the time, and converted to a passing facade of being Christian in order to emigrate from Germany, at this time, the branch of the family lived in Prussia which would now be part of Poland. They would have been persecuted for being Jewish, if nothing else.

In any case, my grandmother's family in Iowa were Unitarians, and from what I know, it was at her mother's insistence, not her father's, which seems a bit odd, given that he was Lutheran from his baptismal records.
Aravar
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Post by Aravar »

32/33 too. We're so much better educated over here.

I disagree with D for question 33. If revenue=spending it doesn't follow that tax per person equals spending per person, except in a statistical sense. I think that must be what they meant, on reflection, altohugh using per capita would have helped give the sense.
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Dave_LF
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Post by Dave_LF »

I didn't like that one either. Even in the latter case, it assumes that the population size is static, or that tax dollars are spent the instant they're collected.
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WampusCat
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Post by WampusCat »

That was one of the two I got "wrong."
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Primula Baggins
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Post by Primula Baggins »

And one of the three I did.
“There, peeping among the cloud-wrack above a dark tor high up in the mountains, Sam saw a white star twinkle for a while. The beauty of it smote his heart, as he looked up out of the forsaken land, and hope returned to him. For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King
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axordil
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Post by axordil »

That was my bugaboo too. I could imagine situations where it was simply untrue for specific cases.
baby tuckoo
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Post by baby tuckoo »

I got 31, and I missed the same ones as most, for the same reasons.


I feel that I've been discriminated against because of my age.
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truehobbit
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Post by truehobbit »

If you got 33 wrong, which option did you guys pick and why? :shock:
I agree the answer was a bit daft, as it basically just rephrased the question - but all the other options were so obviously nonsensical! :scratch:
but being a cheerful hobbit he had not needed hope, as long as despair could be postponed.
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