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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 11:33 pm 
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halo optional
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Dave_LF wrote:
Good thing I've never said it aloud. :D


I have. :halo:

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"A cage," Éowyn said. "To stay behind bars, until use and old age accept them, and all chance of doing great deeds is gone beyond recall or desire.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 11:38 pm 
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The correct pronunciation of "actual" is actually "attle". You could look it up, but rather just trust me.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 11:39 pm 
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Yes, as far as we could throw you. :suspicious:

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“There, peeping among the cloud-wrack above a dark tor high up in the mountains, Sam saw a white star twinkle for a while. The beauty of it smote his heart, as he looked up out of the forsaken land, and hope returned to him. For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 16, 2008 10:28 pm 
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Looks like it might be time to think about moving on again. I'll give it a few days, and if no further discussion seems to be forthcoming, I'll start a new thread (unless someone else wants to step forward and do it).

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Woods is most felt. Nice! it's gentle on your mind.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2008 2:25 pm 
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Lali Beag Bídeach
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(I'm happy to let you start the new thread, but I just wanted to say that I'm looking forward to it. :) )


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 25, 2008 11:12 pm 
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I would say it is definitely time to move on. But I'm a bit busy right now, what with proofing the galleys for my book, on top of work, and classes, and preparing for two shows in September. So I would strongly urge someone else to step forward and start a new thread. Again, it isn't necessary to summarize the whole chapter, just say whatever you feel like to get the discussion rolling. And it is another short (but interesting and important) chapter.

Of course if no one has done so and I get a chance to do it, I will. ;)

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Woods is most felt. Nice! it's gentle on your mind.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 27, 2008 12:49 am 
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Lali Beag Bídeach
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Well, I started it; it's not brilliant or anything, but maybe it will get some discussion going.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 01, 2008 11:37 pm 
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Another thing about the food: a host was obliged to feed his guests. Not only to feed them, but to give them the best: the best chair, the best cup and plate, the finest bit of chicken, the softest bread, the sweetest, freshest butter. To do less was to lessen the honour of the house.

The other obligation was that a host could not kill or harm his guests. A guest is sacred. No matter who they were, they were safe. The most grievous insult a host could offer was to boot you out. (Remember in Northanger Abbey?) A host who killed a guest was beyond the pale in every way.

OTOH, you were not obliged to let just anyone enter your house, which is what Grima had arranged for Meduseld. Because once the guests were under your roof, they were untouchable.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 30, 2013 7:12 pm 
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Mushrooms and bacon: my strongest memory from this chapter.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 31, 2013 5:05 am 
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And, if one took nothing else from reading this part of LotR, this would be sufficient.

Mushrooms.

Bacon.

:D

<sends some love toward vison's memory, and some recognition toward her points>

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“There, peeping among the cloud-wrack above a dark tor high up in the mountains, Sam saw a white star twinkle for a while. The beauty of it smote his heart, as he looked up out of the forsaken land, and hope returned to him. For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 31, 2013 8:52 pm 
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Must. Have. Mushrooms. And. Bacon. :)

Boy, just a short mention of vison makes me tear up. So many years of her humor and lightheartedness left a significant impression on me, and I never even met her in person!


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 5:08 pm 
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The problem with that is that American bacon and English bacon are two such different things! (Give me super-crisp American bacon any day--it's about the only way I'll eat meat fat!)

I agree with what's been said about the tension-and-relief aspects of the chapter. It helps prepare the reader for much more tense chapters and much more meaningful reliefs. And good old Merry! I love that hobbit! "Who did you think it was?" Who indeed!

Yes, a nod and a sigh for Vison.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 5:11 pm 
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From my experience, you can ask the English to just cook it a little longer. Most are far too polite to refuse! :)


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 5:05 pm 
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Right, but the form is different. English bacon is what we'd call ham, from a part of the critter that has its muscle broken up by other things. Cooking it longer would just make it tougher, and wouldn't do a thing to the fat. American bacon is slab bacon cut thin, fat and muscle striped, which if it's cured correctly will fry up crisp like a potato chip, without burning. Of course, it's increasingly difficult to find it cured properly...


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 6:03 pm 
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Morwenna wrote:
Right, but the form is different. English bacon is what we'd call ham, from a part of the critter that has its muscle broken up by other things. Cooking it longer would just make it tougher, and wouldn't do a thing to the fat.

No, I always have my bacon crispy and the fat crisps up first. Most people grill it (broiling, I think you call it) but I lay it out on a wire rack and cook in a hot oven (not sure if that constitutes 'baking'). It is cut thicker than American bacon, though.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 7:36 pm 
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Does it make the fat truly crispy? not chewy? Otherwise I'll be trimming it to death the way I do ham or any other meat. Sorry, but I have an overactive gag response and after 66 years I doubt it'll go away!


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 1:58 am 
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Try bacon and mushrooms on a pizza sometime. It's good! ;)


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 5:02 am 
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Morwenna wrote:
Right, but the form is different. English bacon is what we'd call ham, from a part of the critter that has its muscle broken up by other things. Cooking it longer would just make it tougher, and wouldn't do a thing to the fat. American bacon is slab bacon cut thin, fat and muscle striped, which if it's cured correctly will fry up crisp like a potato chip, without burning. Of course, it's increasingly difficult to find it cured properly...


Sure, though it depends where you are and what sort of establishment it is. During my 2-year stint in southern England, the bacon I got for breakfast at my favorite hole in the wall was essentially American/ Canadian style. Though by default, they wouldn't cook it crispy unless you requested it.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 7:31 am 
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Passdagas the Brown wrote:
Sure, though it depends where you are and what sort of establishment it is. During my 2-year stint in southern England, the bacon I got for breakfast at my favorite hole in the wall was essentially American/ Canadian style. Though by default, they wouldn't cook it crispy unless you requested it.


Hey, PtB, what part of southern England were you in? Anywhere near my neck of the woods?

Most greasy joe's over here will fry the bacon and use the fat to fry the eggs afterwards. I do mine under the grill, but the bacon goes in the pan with the mushrooms and tomatoes, and the sausages go on the rack over it!

Here's a good article, anyway, on the differences:

A Guide to Bacon Styles, and How to Make Proper British Rashers

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 8:31 am 
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Morwenna wrote:
Does it make the fat truly crispy? not chewy? Otherwise I'll be trimming it to death the way I do ham or any other meat. Sorry, but I have an overactive gag response and after 66 years I doubt it'll go away!

Oh yes (honest!). I hate springy, rubbery fat, too. I also like American bacon so I'm aiming for that, even if it's not quite the same. I turn the bacon over three or four times so maybe that helps.


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