It is currently Mon Dec 11, 2017 2:19 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 240 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 12:34 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2005 4:31 pm
Posts: 5869
Shelob'sAppetite wrote:
Holbytla wrote:
Shelob'sAppetite wrote:
SirDennis wrote:
Shelob'sAppetite wrote:
Impenitent wrote:
I don't know to what you refer, but am afraid to ask.


According to the Hobbit Visual Companion, the Great Goblin's throne doubles as a toilet. He is so lazy and overweight that he prefers to relieve himself without getting up...


The sad irony here is that some people addicted to slot machines have been known to do the same thing. I knew a guy whose upholstery business thrived for a time because of this. In the end the Casino installed chairs that could be cleaned rather than needing to be re-covered.


I have heard of such things. So, one could say that this is not inconsistent with reality.

However, there's a world of difference between a guy at a Casino in the 21st century, and Tolkien's quietly humorous book, the Hobbit. In no universe should an adaptation of Tolkien include a character crapping into a custom-made throne-toilet. It is about as far from Tolkien as anything I can imagine.

Even moreso than this: :llama:


Agree and disagree.

Modernization notwithstanding, You could draw similarities between Shelob's Lair and its accumulated years of filth and a Goblin throne immersed in self made piles of excrement. Sure that was from a darker Tolkien story, and the language was benign, but it was most certainly Tolkien.


IMO, those are two very different things.

Shelob's lair is described as having accumulated layers of filth, but Tolkien doesn't dwell on it, or elaborate. No scenes of Frodo stepping in poodoo or anything. Nor does Tolkien talk about Shelob's gastrointestinal and bathroom-going habits.

The Goblin King toilet-throne, if featured, is unlike anything Tolkien would ever write about. It is gratuitous grotesquery, which Tolkien never engaged in, in neither the Hobbit, LOTR or any of his other writings.

It would be a PJism, plain and simple.


Before we proceed any further, let it be known that you are dealing with someone who has been a large PJ detractor over the last dozen years or so. I was as angry after my first viewing of the Fellowship as I have ever been at a theater. I wanted to smite PJ with all the smiteness that could ever be smited.

I haven't cooled down all that much either.

Having said that, neither of us has viewed the scene, unless you went to the premiere, so it is all speculation as to the extent of PJ's blasphemy at this point.

The mere matter of fecal matter in Tolkien's works are not only not unheard of, but there is more than an instance of reference to that throughout his writings. Yes his language couched the "matter" in a gentlemanly sort of way, but the subject was still broached.

It is entirely possible that, given the inevitable PG-13 rating and Phil and Fran, that PJ has managed to portray the scene in a manner that is not, but almost, but not quite, entirely unlike Tolkien.

Hope for the best, expect the worst.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 1:14 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 19, 2012 5:00 pm
Posts: 329
Holbytla wrote:
Shelob'sAppetite wrote:
Holbytla wrote:
Shelob'sAppetite wrote:
SirDennis wrote:
Shelob'sAppetite wrote:
Impenitent wrote:
I don't know to what you refer, but am afraid to ask.


According to the Hobbit Visual Companion, the Great Goblin's throne doubles as a toilet. He is so lazy and overweight that he prefers to relieve himself without getting up...


The sad irony here is that some people addicted to slot machines have been known to do the same thing. I knew a guy whose upholstery business thrived for a time because of this. In the end the Casino installed chairs that could be cleaned rather than needing to be re-covered.


I have heard of such things. So, one could say that this is not inconsistent with reality.

However, there's a world of difference between a guy at a Casino in the 21st century, and Tolkien's quietly humorous book, the Hobbit. In no universe should an adaptation of Tolkien include a character crapping into a custom-made throne-toilet. It is about as far from Tolkien as anything I can imagine.

Even moreso than this: :llama:


Agree and disagree.

Modernization notwithstanding, You could draw similarities between Shelob's Lair and its accumulated years of filth and a Goblin throne immersed in self made piles of excrement. Sure that was from a darker Tolkien story, and the language was benign, but it was most certainly Tolkien.


IMO, those are two very different things.

Shelob's lair is described as having accumulated layers of filth, but Tolkien doesn't dwell on it, or elaborate. No scenes of Frodo stepping in poodoo or anything. Nor does Tolkien talk about Shelob's gastrointestinal and bathroom-going habits.

The Goblin King toilet-throne, if featured, is unlike anything Tolkien would ever write about. It is gratuitous grotesquery, which Tolkien never engaged in, in neither the Hobbit, LOTR or any of his other writings.

It would be a PJism, plain and simple.


Before we proceed any further, let it be known that you are dealing with someone who has been a large PJ detractor over the last dozen years or so. I was as angry after my first viewing of the Fellowship as I have ever been at a theater. I wanted to smite PJ with all the smiteness that could ever be smited.

I haven't cooled down all that much either.

Having said that, neither of us has viewed the scene, unless you went to the premiere, so it is all speculation as to the extent of PJ's blasphemy at this point.

The mere matter of fecal matter in Tolkien's works are not only not unheard of, but there is more than an instance of reference to that throughout his writings. Yes his language couched the "matter" in a gentlemanly sort of way, but the subject was still broached.

It is entirely possible that, given the inevitable PG-13 rating and Phil and Fran, that PJ has managed to portray the scene in a manner that is not, but almost, but not quite, entirely unlike Tolkien.

Hope for the best, expect the worst.


Just quoting because I like the box-within-box effect that happens on this messageboard. :)

I understand your point completely. There is a "basis" for it in Tolkien.

My only point, as Voronwë mentioned, is that the "gentlemanly" language that Tolkien uses is very, very important to the story, and the reader's experience of the story. Had Tolkien deployed lots of gratuitous and vulgar language, including long descriptions of gastrointestinal processes, and disgusting implements for aiding in such processes, I doubt his books would still be beloved today.

IMO, a good film-maker engaging in adaptation finds a way of capturing the essence of a textual story in a visual way. Peter Jackson, as it seems you agree, doesn't pull that off. And the main reason, IMO, is style, not substance.

That is why I largely agree that PJ adhered to the key broad themes of Tolkien's work, while utterly failing to capture the spirit of the books.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 2:00 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2005 4:31 pm
Posts: 5869
You are preaching to the choir.

Okay let me try it this way;
http://forums.theonering.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=9920&hilit=goat

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 2:29 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 19, 2012 5:00 pm
Posts: 329
Holbytla wrote:
You are preaching to the choir.

Okay let me try it this way;
http://forums.theonering.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=9920&hilit=goat


Oh, I know PCarolino very well. And The Dwarf!

The question for those who have seen the Hobbit is: Does not Bofur throat sing? And, how many goats does Bilbo sell to pay for journey?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 2:38 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2005 4:31 pm
Posts: 5869
Just in case that doesn't work;

http://forums.theonering.com/viewtopic.php?t=13666start=30

:P

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 5:44 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 1:31 am
Posts: 842
Location: Canada
Shelob wrote:
My only point, as Voronwë mentioned, is that the "gentlemanly" language that Tolkien uses is very, very important to the story, and the reader's experience of the story. Had Tolkien deployed lots of gratuitous and vulgar language, including long descriptions of gastrointestinal processes, and disgusting implements for aiding in such processes, I doubt his books would still be beloved today.


True, and they would be called Game of Thrones (both swipe at GoT and pun intended).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 3:51 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 19, 2012 5:00 pm
Posts: 329
Holbytla wrote:


My favorite line from ukhem:

Quote:
do not call me deluded you fish of the stink.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 3:53 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 19, 2012 5:00 pm
Posts: 329
SirDennis wrote:
Shelob wrote:
My only point, as Voronwë mentioned, is that the "gentlemanly" language that Tolkien uses is very, very important to the story, and the reader's experience of the story. Had Tolkien deployed lots of gratuitous and vulgar language, including long descriptions of gastrointestinal processes, and disgusting implements for aiding in such processes, I doubt his books would still be beloved today.


True, and they would be called Game of Thrones (both swipe at GoT and pun intended).


I'm with you there!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 4:01 pm 
Offline
Feeling grateful
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:41 am
Posts: 32714
Another encouraging comment from Razerback at TORC:

Quote:
One more bit from my friend... she said that her friend (a dude) thought the first half of the movie was kind of boring. But she loved that stuff (similarly how I love all the hobbit stuff in the extended edition of FOTR). They both agreed that once the movie starts rolling along that it is as good, if not better than FOTR.

She is hyping me up!

_________________
Woods is most felt. Nice! it's gentle on your mind.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 4:07 pm 
Offline
Wrong within normal parameters
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 17, 2006 9:59 am
Posts: 4218
Location: The other side of Michigan
I'm glad the first half is boring. It just means they aren't rushing through the setup to get to the action.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 4:07 pm 
Offline
Feeling grateful
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:41 am
Posts: 32714
Exactly why I called it "encouraging".

_________________
Woods is most felt. Nice! it's gentle on your mind.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 4:55 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 19, 2012 5:00 pm
Posts: 329
Dave_LF wrote:
I'm glad the first half is boring. It just means they aren't rushing through the setup to get to the action.


Agreed 100%. Lots of "dudes" think the first half of FOTR, both the book and film, are boring, yet for me it's the absolute best part of both the book and film.

I have to say that I am quite encouraged by this. I also have to say that the more leisurely pacing may be due to the three-film decision, which I was always a fan of for this very reason. Hopefully these films breathe a lot more than LOTR did.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2013 7:07 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 23, 2009 5:03 pm
Posts: 5199
Location: Green Hill Country
Oscar Nominees Talk Hobbit Set Design

On Saturday February 23rd, the Egyptian Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard was the venue for “The Art of Production Design,” jointly sponsored by the Art Directors Guild, the Set Decorators Society of America, and the American Cinematheque. and featuring a panel made up from the production designers for Lincoln, Anna Karenina, Life of Pi, and Les Misérables, as well as The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey.

Dan Hennah was there as production designer along with Ra Vincent and Simon Bright, the set decorators.

Quote:
Dan Hennah assured the audience that the designs for The Hobbit were not just a return to The Lord of the Rings. There were new challenges involved in what he called a “long and relentless journey.” A great deal of pre-production had taken place during the period when Guillermo del Toro was on board as director. Once Peter Jackson took over, everything was revisited.

_________________
There is magic in long-distance friendships. They let you relate to other human beings in a way that goes beyond being physically together and is often more profound.
~Diana Cortes


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 12:48 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 23, 2009 5:03 pm
Posts: 5199
Location: Green Hill Country
New video up on Jackson's FB page:

New Zealand: Home of Middle-earth

The cast talk about their experience and enjoyment of location filming in NZ...

_________________
There is magic in long-distance friendships. They let you relate to other human beings in a way that goes beyond being physically together and is often more profound.
~Diana Cortes


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 3:27 pm 
Offline
of Vinyamar
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:39 pm
Posts: 7910
Location: Ireland
Does anyone else feel like we're going to have seen all the EE DVD Extras by the time the set comes out?

Not that I'm complaining, mind.

_________________
Image
The Vinyamars on Stage! This time at Bag End


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 5:12 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 23, 2009 5:03 pm
Posts: 5199
Location: Green Hill Country
Yeah, though someone on TORn reckoned it was among the extras on the Blu-Ray. It's not on the UK version I bought... :scratch:

It was the same with the "A Hobbit's Tale" video you could get if you bought the Blu-Ray from Best Buy - WB seem to be encouraging suppliers' exclusives, rather than letting fans have everything in one place. Doesn't bode well for the EEs...

_________________
There is magic in long-distance friendships. They let you relate to other human beings in a way that goes beyond being physically together and is often more profound.
~Diana Cortes


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 9:09 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 23, 2009 5:03 pm
Posts: 5199
Location: Green Hill Country
Hobbit set fires up for new movie shoot

Quote:
Filming on The Hobbit trilogy will resume this month on Mt Crawford in Wellington, where a patch of bush has been transformed into a gutted citadel.

Sir Peter Jackson's spokesman, Matt Dravitzki, said the site on Miramar Peninsula was being prepared for a few days' filming as part of 10 weeks of final-cut shooting for the last two instalments of the trilogy.

_________________
There is magic in long-distance friendships. They let you relate to other human beings in a way that goes beyond being physically together and is often more profound.
~Diana Cortes


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2014 11:44 pm 
Offline
Feeling grateful
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:41 am
Posts: 32714
See the complete Dale set from above

_________________
Woods is most felt. Nice! it's gentle on your mind.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2014 5:09 pm 
Offline
Aagragaah
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:31 pm
Posts: 12820
Location: Out on the banks
To quote Gandalf, it's quite cool. :)

_________________
Image
‘There’s no greys, only white that’s got grubby. I’m surprised you don’t know that. And sin, young man, is when you treat people as things. Including yourself. That’s what sin is.’
‘It’s a lot more complicated than that -’
‘No. It ain’t. When people say things are a lot more complicated than that, they means they’re getting worried that they won’t like the truth. People as things, that’s where it starts.’
Terry Pratchett, Carpe Jugulum


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 7:29 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 23, 2009 5:03 pm
Posts: 5199
Location: Green Hill Country
Great article on the Lake-Town and Dale sets...

http://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/film/63854125/There-and-back-again

_________________
There is magic in long-distance friendships. They let you relate to other human beings in a way that goes beyond being physically together and is often more profound.
~Diana Cortes


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 240 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group