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PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2008 11:42 pm 
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vison wrote:
He was, if you liked Bogart. But I never did, and that's where I went wrong, I guess. :(


If it's any comfort, I don't like him much either. I don't loathe him or anything, I just don't :love: him.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2008 12:00 am 
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Actually, Holby, I've never seen The Caine Mutiny, so I didn't know Bogart played Queeg. I read the book a couple of times, though.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2008 12:11 am 
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Same here. Wow; its hard for me to imagine Bogart in that part. (Reminds me that it's time to re-read the book, though.)

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2008 5:08 am 
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vison wrote:
I also couldn't stand Citizen Kane. I don't get it. I just don't. I mean, I know what it's ABOUT, but I don't get why critics rave about it. I don't know many regular people who like it.


I’ve always found it interesting (and possibly reflective on film criticism in general) that the most critically-acclaimed film of all time doesn’t seem to have that many fans. Its praise comes from the story (the whole man doing bad things from his good intentions is a classic with literary types) and the technical innovations from the film itself (the novel use of low camera angles, showing the passage of time through rapid editing, use of symbolism, etc).

Personally, I think that the point of a film is to be entertaining, and so while I can appreciate Kane as an achievement (especially from the 25-year-old Orson Welles) it’ll never be one of my favourites, nor do I consider it the greatest film of all time.

I largely agree with yovargas about Casablanca - it's strength comes from a brilliant script brilliantly acted.

By the way, what does ‘here’s looking at you, kid’ actually mean?


Last edited by Túrin Turambar on Sun Jun 29, 2008 5:36 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2008 5:16 am 
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CK is a tragedy. Tragedies are rarely entertaining but often enlightening.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2008 6:18 am 
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It's a toast, L_M. "Here's [to] looking at you, kid." Meaning looking at Ingrid Bergman is well worth doing, which, well—even I have to agree with that.

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“There, peeping among the cloud-wrack above a dark tor high up in the mountains, Sam saw a white star twinkle for a while. The beauty of it smote his heart, as he looked up out of the forsaken land, and hope returned to him. For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2008 6:32 am 
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Primula Baggins wrote:
It's a toast, L_M. "Here's [to] looking at you, kid." Meaning looking at Ingrid Bergman is well worth doing, which, well—even I have to agree with that.


Ah, I see - it didn't quite make sense to me without the 'to'.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2008 8:17 am 
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Primula Baggins wrote:
Actually, Holby, I've never seen The Caine Mutiny, so I didn't know Bogart played Queeg. I read the book a couple of times, though.


It's a good movie but I liked the book better. I'm not sure he completely pulled of Queeg, but he was good in the role.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 7:43 am 
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A Fortuitous Meeting
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“It may help to understand human affairs to be clear that most of the great triumphs and tragedies of history are caused, not by people being fundamentally good or fundamentally bad, but by people being fundamentally people.”

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 7:56 am 
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Frelga :D

I saw Citizen Kane only once, years ago, and due to a sieve-like mind, I can't remember many details. I remember the main storyline, I remember the opening and closing, I remember feeling chilled as the lead character descended deeper into cynicism and cold-heartedness. I also remember I was very moved by the film. I can't say I enjoyed it, but the psychological portrayal cut deep for me. So, yes, I really do like the film very much - and now that it's been brought forward for me again, am much inclined to hiring it soon. I wonder whether it will strike me as powerfully as it did the first time?


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 1:21 pm 
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Impy, is that your photo in your avatar? Gorgeous!

I must have a critic's mindset, because I love both Casablanca and Citizen Kane. Part of it is a visceral response to the cinematography. As filmed, Bergman is the epitome of beauty. Kane's world is painfully dark: sumptuous but hollow.

I suspect cinematographers had to work harder when they were limited to black and white. The best ones made the gray scale glow in a way that makes color seem drab.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 1:36 pm 
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I don't know if it is having a critic's mindset, so much as having good taste (as you demonstrate with the first comment in your post :)). Both are great films, although for different reasons.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 2:19 pm 
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Both are great films. But there are films we recognize as great, and there are films we love (that, say, we watch over and over with pleasure). For most people the two categories intersect, but they certainly don't overlap 100%.

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“There, peeping among the cloud-wrack above a dark tor high up in the mountains, Sam saw a white star twinkle for a while. The beauty of it smote his heart, as he looked up out of the forsaken land, and hope returned to him. For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King


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 Post subject: Re: Casablanca
PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 8:32 am 
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Just bumped this Bush-era thread to observe that the last person to have a speaking role in Casablanca has died. Madeleine Lebeau would be another of those actors who is best-known worldwide for a role played very early in her career.


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 Post subject: Re: Casablanca
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2016 8:32 pm 
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And she was actually a refugee from occupied France when it was filmed, so she had plenty to draw on for her performance.

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“There, peeping among the cloud-wrack above a dark tor high up in the mountains, Sam saw a white star twinkle for a while. The beauty of it smote his heart, as he looked up out of the forsaken land, and hope returned to him. For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King


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 Post subject: Re: Casablanca
PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2016 10:38 am 
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I showed "Casablanca" to my 7th grade class last year - we had been doing a brief unit on National Anthems and I had shown them the famous scene ("Play La Marseillaise! Play it!") and they were very taken with it and wanted to see the entire film. So, at the end of the year, we watched the whole thing. I gave them a little background and told them that one of the reasons I liked it was that it had everything - love, death, betrayal, humor, patriotism, war and friendship.

After it was over, three of the boys told me that it was "the BEST movie" they had ever seen - ever! They wanted to know if "that guy" (meaning Bogart) was in any other movies! :D :D :D

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