It is currently Fri Jun 22, 2018 1:05 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2005 8:26 pm 
Offline
Feeling grateful
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:41 am
Posts: 33395
Note: I changed the title of this thread because the discussion has move in another (and I think more interesting) direction.

This is concept that I have never heard of before, but I heard it mentioned on the radio today.

Quote:
Ecological Art is a worldwide movement, the philosophy of which is based on ecological awareness, the harmonic coexistance of human beings and nature. It is a revitalizing movement in terms of materials used in works of art, which are in many cases, recycled and natural at the same time. Most of them emphasize the beauty of nature as a masterpiece, but one which is as fragile and vulnerable as our own life.


This from an essay entitled Ecological Art and Ethics - the main site is http://www.ecologicalart.com/. Is this a phenomenom that I anyone knows more about it? I would be interested in learning more.

_________________
Woods is most felt. Nice! it's gentle on your mind.


Last edited by Voronwë the Faithful on Sun Dec 04, 2005 3:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2005 1:37 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2005 10:15 am
Posts: 161
Tempting me, eh V? ;)

I know nothing about this... but it reminded me of Christo's "Surrounded Islands", a project that I found much more beautiful than his (in)famous wrapping of the Reichstag...

http://www.christojeanneclaude.net/si.html

I'll be back. [/Terminator]


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2005 2:15 am 
Offline
Feeling grateful
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:41 am
Posts: 33395
:bow:

That looks like quite the project. :shock:

_________________
Woods is most felt. Nice! it's gentle on your mind.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2005 2:37 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 1:34 pm
Posts: 2848
I suppose I’m just a knuckle-dragger, Ber, but I don’t get it and I’m not certain that there’s much to be “got.”

Of course I can appreciate that such things may be very interesting to look at, and that design and color skills are necessary to plan and execute them. But it strikes me that the greatest skill in evidence is the ability of the artist to extract money from the wallets of whoever pays for this stuff.

My namesake was charged with “flinging a pot of paint in the public’s face,” so I am hesitant to dismiss as nonsense anything that displays no apparent talent to the uneducated eye. I don’t require that art reproduce nature; but what, exactly, is the point? And where is the merit? And why should I care?

If I had the money (and the inclination) to cover my house with red shag carpeting, by what reasoning would you call my work inferior to this? If I had about fifteen minutes, I could write a little article explaining why a carpet-covered house makes a profound esthetic or sociological statement. You know how easy it is to blow pseudo-intellectual smoke.

So please enlighten me, if I am a fool. We can’t let Whistler be a Philistine, can we?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2005 4:26 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:04 am
Posts: 7283
Art using "found objects" has been around for a long time.

The day care center that my children inhabited when they were pre-school age was operated by a research center in the "University City" neighborhood of Philadelphia. The owner was very much an art afficianado and he commissioned a mosaic that covered an entire side of the building, made entirely from objects found on the streets of the neighborhood.

Abstract, of course, but with recognizable geometric shapes like car wheels and partial faces made from bits of glass and metal. It was magnificent. Truly beautiful. And what a great thing for the children to be able to look at and touch.

This is recycling of a sort :) and also an ecological statement (imo) about what we consider 'trash.'

My cousin is a carpenter and cabinet maker. He has his own business now doing custom woodworking but for years he worked for one of those do-it-yourself home repair stores, and in his spare time he would comb landfills for discarded wood and use it to make jewelry and jewelry boxes.

Beer palettes are made out of solid mahogany, if you can imagine that, and then discarded in land fills when the slats crack. I have a collection of really gorgeous jewelry boxes that my cousin made out of precious woods found in landfills. I absolutely treasure these - one, because I'm related to the artist, and two, because they do make a profound statement about our values.

Jn

_________________
A fool's paradise is a wise man's hell.


Last edited by Jnyusa on Wed Nov 30, 2005 10:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2005 4:35 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 1:34 pm
Posts: 2848
All of that makes perfect sense, artistically and intellectually, and from a practical standpoint, as well.

Still trying to figure out that pink-trimmed island, though.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2005 5:20 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:04 am
Posts: 7283
Oh ... well, there's art and there's publicity.

"Surrounded Islands was a work of art which underlined the various elements and ways in which the people of Miami live, between land and water."

Does this mean that everyone in Miami has pink carpeting?

Maybe just pink flamingos on the lawn.

Jn

_________________
A fool's paradise is a wise man's hell.


Last edited by Jnyusa on Wed Nov 30, 2005 10:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2005 9:59 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2005 10:15 am
Posts: 161
Oh, I don't know. I haven't read the manifesto. But it strikes a chord with me... I just find it beautiful! :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2005 5:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 1:34 pm
Posts: 2848
Ah, but a spiderweb is beautiful, too! Yet a spider has no mind, no heart, no soul. Can we call a spider an artist?

If an artist constructed a gigantic spiderweb spanning the Grand Canyon, it would be an incredible feat of engineering that would astonish the beholder. But it would never be quite the achievement of a real spiderweb, produced by a creature capable of no more real creativity than a thumbtack.

Somewhere we have abandoned the old-fashioned notion of talent. I don't suggest that the artist be reduced to a performing pony, but I do think we should expect him to have some innate (or learned) ability that others lack. And by that I mean something more than the ability to envision something outrageous.

I'm sure I'm wrong, as usual!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2005 6:03 pm 
Offline
Feeling grateful
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:41 am
Posts: 33395
I'm tempted to change the title to "What is Art?" Now that would be interesting discussion. :shock:

_________________
Woods is most felt. Nice! it's gentle on your mind.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2005 7:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 1:34 pm
Posts: 2848
What is art? Art is what artists make.

Who is an artist? Anybody who says he is.

Okay. Whatever!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2005 7:50 pm 
Offline
Living in hope
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:43 am
Posts: 39134
Location: Sailing the luminiferous aether
Yes, and a violinist is anyone who says he is, too.

_________________
“There, peeping among the cloud-wrack above a dark tor high up in the mountains, Sam saw a white star twinkle for a while. The beauty of it smote his heart, as he looked up out of the forsaken land, and hope returned to him. For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2005 12:25 am 
Offline
Feeling grateful
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:41 am
Posts: 33395
Sadly, Prim, that is very much true when comes to drums, because of the drum circle/community drumming phenomenom. I will definitely be starting a thread about this in The Cottage of Lost Play in the near future.

_________________
Woods is most felt. Nice! it's gentle on your mind.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2005 1:34 am 
Offline
Living in hope
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:43 am
Posts: 39134
Location: Sailing the luminiferous aether
Well, drums are, y'know, primal. All our hearts beat, so we can all beat drums.

Sorry. I'll stop, with the observation that I've watched the percussion section in Mahler's Resurrection Symphony, and those people have been practicing.

I dearly hope to hear you play someday.

_________________
“There, peeping among the cloud-wrack above a dark tor high up in the mountains, Sam saw a white star twinkle for a while. The beauty of it smote his heart, as he looked up out of the forsaken land, and hope returned to him. For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2005 11:52 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2005 10:15 am
Posts: 161
I still find those Surrounded Islands beautiful. And I still can't explain why. :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2005 2:35 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 1:34 pm
Posts: 2848
There is no need to justify it, Ber. I'm just trying to reconcile work of this nature with work by traditional painters, and wondering what they would have to say.

Perhaps one of the great things about art is that we can never quite pin it down. It defies all our puny attempts at definition.

I’m expecting you to teach us some things about Turner, when you can.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2005 5:46 pm 
Offline
Best friends forever
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:33 pm
Posts: 11961
Location: Over there.
Voronwë_the_Faithful wrote:
Sadly, Prim, that is very much true when comes to drums, because of the drum circle/community drumming phenomenom. I will definitely be starting a thread about this in The Cottage of Lost Play in the near future.


Voronwë, I'm sure you've heard teh old joke?

Question: What do you call the loser who hangs around with a rock band?

Answer: the drummer.

Sorry, sorry, sorry, sorry. :)


I heard a pretty famous drummer being interviewed once. I don't remember his name, but it wasn't Ringo Starr! Anyway, he said when people go into a club or a concert not one of them imagines that he could go onstage and play the guitar or the piano, but everyone thinks they could sit in for the drummer!

I don't, of course. I know MY limits. :D

We used to have a kid who worked for us who played drums in several well-known local bands on the West Coast. He was a good drummer, I hear. BUT. He was at a dance with us one time and I danced with him and that boy had no sense of rhythm AT ALL. My poor feet were covered with bruises! I could not understand it. Still can't.

_________________
Dig deeper.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2005 7:10 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:04 am
Posts: 7283
I LOVE percussionists. They are the greatest people, and the most likely to take the music into their very souls.

Of course, the percussionists I've known have all played with symphony orchestras ... it's been moons and moons since I followed a rock band around .... and for a classical percussionists the tone is as important as the rhythm because many of their instruments do have tonality. Getting correct intonation out of a percussion instrument is very difficult; you can't even touch classical percussion without a perfect ear.

Jn

_________________
A fool's paradise is a wise man's hell.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group