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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 4:00 pm 
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This has been reported in the UK Press. Terry has been diagnosed with a rare form of Alzheimers following a 'phantom' stroke earlier in the year. He has issued a statement which indicates that at the very least he expects to complete his next two books.

Daily Telegraph Article


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 4:54 pm 
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I was so sad to hear that, Aravar. What a dreadful diagnosis.

He seems determined to make the best of it for as long as possible.

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― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 5:31 pm 
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Alzheimer's is always dreadful, early onset of anything always terrible, and early onset of Alzheimer's in the case of someone who works primarily with his creative brain is just -- awful. :(

Like a cellist, for whom dexterity is everything, being struck down by MS (Jacqueline du Pré) or a composer going deaf (Beethoven) or an artist losing his eyesight (several!).

very sad


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2007 6:10 am 
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:(

I am so sad to hear this. Partly a selfish response - it seems worse somehow because I know and love his books so much.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2007 6:18 am 
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I don't think he'd see that as selfish, Imp. I'd bet he'd be delighted to know his books were so important to you.

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“There, peeping among the cloud-wrack above a dark tor high up in the mountains, Sam saw a white star twinkle for a while. The beauty of it smote his heart, as he looked up out of the forsaken land, and hope returned to him. For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2007 8:31 am 
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That is really sad, and not only because he's a great writer, but also because he seems to be quite a nice person. :(

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2007 9:20 am 
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One of my great regrets in life is that when I was in my first term at University, in 1988, he was at Dillons for a book signing. Unlike today there was no massive queue- indeed when he came down I was the only person there. I could have chatted but I was too overawed in the presence of a Famous Author.

I also missed a meeting of the RPGsoc a few months later when he came and was chatting to a very small group :( . One of my friends went and came back with the startling information that Terry was thinking of only doing a dozen books. Good job he changed his mind!!!!!


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2007 2:39 pm 
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I've only just got started on his books. We are listening to the second one as we commute each day, and now I get a twinge of sadness each time I turn the CD player on, because the one we are listening to, "Making Money" was just published this year, and that means there won't be many more books with this character.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2007 12:40 am 
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Pratchett is the only writer whose books brought me more pleasure than Tolkien. He soars high enough to write that a man is WHERE THE FALLING ANGEL MEETS THE RISING APE, and to have Death say it. And he is earthy enough to say that the difference between erotic and kinky is "the difference between using the feather and using the chicken." And he's got guts and heart and wisdom and the eye.

But hey, he aten't dead yet! Here's hoping for a good few more from him.

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PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 6:09 am 
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Huh, turns out we don't have a Pratchett thread. Except this one.

Wampus wrote:
"Men at Arms" and "The Last Continent." Worth reading? Which first? Or should I read something else to lead into one of them?


Worth reading? Of course!

Haven't read Last Continent myself. It's a Rincewind novel, so I'd guess it to be a light, funny, punny read located in a place that's a lot like Australia. Rincewind is a failed wizard who is a great racist (The One Hundred Metres, the Mile, the Marathon -- he'd run them all, usually away from danger) but he ends up saving the world time and again. He was in several previous stories, but the plots aren't really sequential, so you don't risk much.

I love Men at Arms. I got my son hooked on Pratchett by reading him the funnier bits. My present sig quote is from it. It is a second City Watch novel, so it'd help to read Guards! Guards! first to understand who Carrot and Vimes are. But it is not a requirement, and you won't be spoiled for Guards! too badly, I don't think.

This is a pretty good summary without too many spoilers.

Quote:
"Be a MAN in the City Watch! The City watch needs MEN!"

But what it's got includes Corporal Carrot (technically a dwarf)*, Lance-constable Cuddy (really a dwarf), Lance-constable Detritus (a troll), Lance-constable Angua (a woman ... most of the time) and Corporal Nobbs (disqualified from the human race for shoving).

And they need all the help they can get. Because there's evil in the air and murder afoot and something very nasty in the streets.

It'd help if it could all be sorted out by noon, because that's when Captain Vimes is officially retiring, handing in his badge and getting married.

And since this is Ankh-Morpork, noon promises to be not just high, but stinking.

* Carrot was two metres tall but he was brought up as a dwarf, and then further up as a human.

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PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 6:49 am 
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The Last Continent is very funny if you're familiar with Australia - lots of puns and lateral references which one may not get unless one has some familiarity. Otherwise - not as great as some of the other Rincewind stories.

And - if Kitkat is reading - Men at Arms is fabulous, although it would add so much more if you could get Guards! Guards! first.


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PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 12:15 pm 
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Thanks for the advice! I'll get Guards! Guards!, but might read Last Continent first.


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PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 9:11 pm 
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Oooh yes. All of the watch books are fantastic. They're my favourite, I think, followed closely by the Rincewind books (anything with Ridcully is good8)).

I'd reccomend that you read all of them! They're all great! (Well, not so much the witch ones, IMHO, but they're good too!)

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PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 10:16 pm 
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Funny, I like the witches best. Closely followed by Watch books. As soli said elsewhere, Night Watch is Pratchett's masterpiece. Rincewind can be hysterical (in both senses) but I don't have the attachment to him the way I do to Granny Weatherwax or Vimes.

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PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 10:28 pm 
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The one I've read was a witch book. The point of view throughout was strongly female, so I can see why that might not grab a young man.

I thought it was excellently done, especially for having been written by a man! A wise one, clearly.

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“There, peeping among the cloud-wrack above a dark tor high up in the mountains, Sam saw a white star twinkle for a while. The beauty of it smote his heart, as he looked up out of the forsaken land, and hope returned to him. For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King


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PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2008 1:58 am 
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Granny Weatherwax is my hero. She is the bomb! And somehow (for me, at least), Prachett has made the witches live in a way that he has not with the other Discworld character.

Not that I don't love Rincewind (he inspired my own wizard, actually), and Ridcully, and Twoflower ( :D Twoflower!) ... and Vimes is fabulous, and Carrot, and Angua, and Dibbler!!! (love Dibbler of many cultures! :D )...

But the witches move in all four dimensions.


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PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2008 4:00 am 
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Truthfully, I could not get into the Wyrd Sisters; I tried to read it recently, and it just didn't spark for me.

:scratch:

I've never read anything else by him either. Maybe I should try again?


Lali

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PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2008 5:21 am 
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Lali, obviously I want to offer a resounding YES, but of course no one is for everyone. But perhaps a Watch or Rincewind book might hit the spot.

And I'm forgetting the Death books! My son says Death is the coolest character. :D

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- Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman, Good Omens


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PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2008 2:32 pm 
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Lali Beag Bídeach
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I'm willing to give him another chance; with so many people speaking so highly of him, I keep thinking that he deserves another shot with me.

So which book specifically? :D All opinions welcome. I'll keep a tally and go with the most popular recommendation.


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PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2008 2:50 pm 
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Well, for my money Nightwatch is his classic, but you'd really need to read some of the other Guards books first.

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